COME LEARN WITH US:
Wednesday, August 28, 2019
a unique conference for
early childhood educators 

Join us for the fourth annual Come Learn With Us conference. As always, the conference will present innovative approaches to early childhood education, challenging you to stretch and critique standard practices. This year, we will be hosting dual keynote speakers, Kim Brooks and Joel Westheimer. This one-of-a-kind conference – dedicated to critique and pedagogical innovation in the nursery years – is is timed to reinvigorate, inspire, and challenge educators just before they go back for the start of the school year. Each workshop will include hands-on interactive components and highlight clear, actionable takeaways.


REGISTER HERE

See below for speaker and workshop information. 

Click here for individual registration information. 
Click here for group registration information.

DETAILS

  • Participants must either register for one full-day workshop or two half-day workshops

  • Both keynote speakers are included in the price of registration. Participants will also receive a free copy of Kim Brooks' recently published book, Small Animals.

  • Registration for the conference is $115

  • Registration includes a kosher lunch from 1-1:40 pm

  • Group registration will be available via a separate link, along with a discount for schools sending their whole teaching staff

  • Please direct all questions to Alex Reynolds at areynolds@jccmanhattan.org.


Conference itinerary

TIME WORKSHOP PRESENTER LOCATION
9:20–10:15 am Keynote I: Parenthood in the Age of Fear Kim Brooks L2
10:30 am–5:15 pm Black Lives Matter. Racial Justice in Early Childhood Education Megan Madison and
Kate Engle
2nd floor,
(these full day workshops will break for Keynote II)
Dialogue as Democracy: Calling Forth the Unheard Voices Mark Horowitz and Sonya Shoptaugh
The Classroom Speaks: Transforming the Classroom into an Exciting Laboratory for Learning Renee Dinnerstein
10:30 am–1 pm Reggio Emilia: Bringing the Philosophy to America Rick Ellis 2nd floor
Using a Child's Voice as Your Guide Kay Abrams
Protecting the Needs of Young Children in a Digital Age Laura Sedlock and Mollie McQuarrie
Loose Parts and Repurposed Materials Julia Bosch
1:00-1:40pm Lunch
1:40-2:30 pm Keynote II: Can Education Transform Our World?
Teaching Towards Justice in Unjust Times
Joel Westheimer L2
2:45–5:15 pm Reggio Emilia: Bringing the Philosophy to America Rick Ellis 2nd floor
Teachers Helping Parents Manage Their Children with Greater Calm Confidence: Less Bribes, Less Threats and Less Exhaustion Kay Abrams
Foundations for Teaching Woodworking in an Early Childhood Setting Judy Kashman
Nurturing the Seeds of Empathy & Moral Decision Making in Early Childhood Alicia Stoller
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Keynote Speakers

Come Learn With: Kim Brooks - SOLD OUT
Parenthood in the Age of Fear

Description:
Twenty-four-hour-news cycle-spawned social panics, changing patterns in family structure, and rampant consumerism have transformed child-rearing from an inherently private relationship into an all-consuming, competitive sport. Learn how expectations of parents have changed in the course of a single generation, and how these expectations—fueled by fear rather than reality—leave working mothers and low-income families with few options, and pressure mothers to report to one another. Children are left with little opportunity to learn about the world on their own, to develop their self-efficacy and control, and connect with their communities.

Kim Brooks is the author of Small Animals: Parenthood in the Age of Fear, described by the National Book Review as “an impassioned, smart work of social criticism and a call for support and empathy,” and by Publishers Weekly as “a disturbingly, ultimately affirming look at why parenting in the contemporary United States is defined by fear.”

A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and recipient of numerous fellowships, her writing has appeared in The New York Times, New York magazine, Good Housekeeping, Chicago Magazine, Salon, Buzzfeed, and elsewhere. She has spoken as a guest on CBS This Morning, PBS Newshour, 20/20, NPR’s All Things Considered, Good Morning America, The Brian Lehrer Show, and many other radio shows and podcasts. Her novel, The Houseguest, was published in 2016. She lives in Chicago. You can follow Kim on Twitter at TK.


Come Learn With: Joel Westheimer - SOLD OUT
Can Education Transform Our World? Teaching Towards Justice in Unjust Times

Description:
Belief in the fundamental importance of education for democracy has been long-standing. Across more than a century of school reform around the world, the idea that young people must learn to be good people, respectful of others and of their communities has concerned teachers, parents and school reformers. But if educators can agree that schools have an essential role to play in preparing students for ethical and informed engagement in social, civic and political life, they cannot seem to agree on what that means. The very same efforts that are applauded by some are viewed as misguided by others. The result for schoolchildren has been a mostly watered-down notion of civics that emphasizes good character and patriotism over critical thinking and engaging with multiple perspectives. At the same time, the number of young people worldwide now willing to entertain nondemocratic forms of government is on the rise. For example, nearly a quarter of U.S. youth aged 16 to 24 believe that democracy is a “bad” or “very bad” way of governing. About 70% of millennials do not think it is essential to live in a country governed by democratic rule of law. So, what should we do about it?

Joel Westheimer
is an education columnist for CBC Radio and University Research Chair in Democracy and Education at the University of Ottawa. Author, speaker, and education advocate, he also co-directs (with John Rogers, UCLA) The Inequality Project, investigating what North American schools are teaching about economic inequality. Westheimer grew up in New York City and began his education career as a summer camp director and then middle school teacher in the New York City Public Schools before obtaining his Ph.D. from Stanford University. His books include the critically acclaimed What Kind of Citizen: Educating Our Children for the Common Good, and the award winning Pledging Allegiance: The Politics of Patriotism in America's Schools (foreword by Howard Zinn) and Among Schoolteachers: Community, Autonomy and Ideology in Teachers’ Work. He is the author of more than 75 academic and professional journal articles, book chapters, and books. He addresses radio and television audiences and has delivered more than 200 keynote speeches, nationally and internationally. He lives with his wife and two children in Ottawa where, in Winter, he ice-skates to and from work. You can visit his website at joelwestheimer.org and follow him on Twitter @joelwestheimer.


Full day workshops

Come Learn With: Megan Madison and Kate Engle
Black Lives Matter. Racial Justice in Early Childhood Education

Description:
During this workshop, we will learn about ways that racism—at its intersection with other systems of oppression—impacts our lives, the lives of the children and families we serve, and the world we live in. Through reflection, discussion, and interactive activities, we will develop the skills to teach for Black lives. We will establish antiracist community agreements, develop shared language, and strengthen our ability to act for racial justice. Together, we will practice identifying ways that racism is manifested in early childhood settings and develop strategies to advance racial equity within (and beyond) your program.

Megan Pamela Ruth Madison is a doctoral candidate at Brandeis University, studying social policy. When she’s not working on finishing up her dissertation, she works part-time as a trainer for the New York Early Childhood Professional Development Institute, the Center for Racial Justice in Education (formerly Border Crossers), and the Human Root. Before graduate school, Megan worked as a preschool teacher in Chicago. This classroom experience grounds her dual passions for education and social justice. Megan holds a bachelor’s degree in studies in religion and a master’s degree in early childhood education. She serves on the governing boards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ).

Kate Engle is an early childhood educator who has taught 3-year-olds for 11 years in New York City independent schools. She currently works with educators and parents as a trainer with the Center for Racial Justice in Education (formerly, Border Crossers), co-facilitating workshops on Talking About Race in the Classroom. She is also an organizer with the citywide White Anti-Racist Educators in Independent Schools group and consults with schools to explore racial identity development and how white racial identity impacts educators, students, and communities.


Come Learn With: Mark Horowitz and Sonya Shoptaugh
Dialogue as Democracy: Calling Forth the Unheard Voices

Description:
“Children talk, and they have always talked, though their words are rarely listened to and leave no trace.

Giving a voice to childhood thus means recognizing children’s right to be the primary authors of their lives. Giving a voice to children is the courageous adventure…that urges us to open our ears and listen to this ‘unheard voice’. “

– Sergio Spaggiari


We believe there is an ethical imperative to have children and their voices returned to childhood. At most early childhood centers across the country, children’s voices go largely unheard, and childhood is missing. We are so caught up in telling children what to think and believe, we have lost sight of these incredible human beings in front of us, whose approach to life is through wonderment, and who already have thoughts, theories, and ideas and are eager to share them.

Children have the right to their own voice. What this means and what this looks like in different cultural contexts is of paramount importance, and is a critical, ethical question for our society. For us to make the statement “children are our youngest citizens” means that children must be given the space and time to participate (something they do quite willingly, if adults allow) and to be an active part of society. They are ready for this, but are we as adults? This will take some time…and practice.

We approach our work through Jewish lenses which help to clarify transcendent Jewish values. Ideally, they are manifest daily in each of our early childhood centers in the quality of our relationships.They inspire and sharpen our vision and enable us to see our world more clearly and in a particularly focused way.

In this interactive session, we explore:

- The power and potential of dialogue in the daily life of the school
- Children’s own unique voices and how to call these forth
- Having a pedagogy of listening and what this requires
- Methods of interpreting and amplifying children’s voices
- Teachers' inner landscapes including our values and images of children, and how this influences how we hear each other and the choices we make
- “Voice” as means of expression for children, parents, and educators and being in the world as engaged citizens

Mark Horowitz is vice president, director of the Sheva Center for early childhood Jewish education and engagement at JCC Association. Mark’s roots and first love are in two-year-old classrooms, where he thrived as a classroom educator for many years. The founding executive director of the Jewish Early Childhood Education Initiative (JECEI), Mark holds a master’s degree in education from SUNY at Buffalo and received ordination and an honorary doctorate from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. He served as the executive director of the Bureau of Jewish Education of Greater Buffalo, New York; the director of education and early childhood at Temple Beth Am in Williamsville, New York; assistant professor of religion and fine arts at Canisius College in Buffalo; and as supervisor of student teachers and teacher of sociology of education and field experience, also at SUNY at Buffalo. He was awarded honorable mention at the 2002 Van Cliburn Foundation’s International Piano Competition for Outstanding Amateurs in Fort Worth, Texas.

Sonya Shoptaugh is internationally recognized as a leading voice in early childhood education and design. She worked at a school for low income families in Washington D.C. called The Model Early Learning Center at the Capital Children’s Museum, the only school to ever be accredited by Reggio Children, Italy. She has been featured on NPR and interviewed by Newsweek and Child Magazine, among other publications. Since 1990, Sonya has consulted, lectured, and taught nationally and internationally at such places as Stanford University, Harvard Department of Education, Columbia University, Carnegie Mellon University, and the State Department of Education. She was the creative director of Where Ideas Learn to Fly, and co-designed a Reggio Inspired exhibit based on the work of teachers in Ohio. For the past 15 years, Sonya has worked closely with Jewish Education initiatives around the country, developing a constructivist approach to Jewish early childhood education. She was a lead consultant as part of JECEI (Jewish Early Childhood Education Initiative), and now works with several major Jewish organizations to promote the lived values of Judaism in the daily life of early childhood classrooms. Sonya is a prize winning photographer, and a writer. She has co-authored numerous articles and chapters in books. She is currently working on a book about artifacts from the Holocaust and the stories they tell. For further information, please check out her Creative Childhood website, creativechildhood.com.


Come Learn With: Renee Dinnerstein - SOLD OUT
The Classroom Speaks: Transforming the Classroom into an Exciting Laboratory for Learning

Description:
In this workshop, we will discuss how to transform a classroom into a place where children build things, conduct experiments, create innovative projects, read fascinating books, write original stories, use technology and texts to research for information, and feel free to try out possibilities. We will think carefully about how to create a space where children grow big ideas, make new friends, and dig deeply into exciting investigations. The workshop will address: Arranging the furniture and materials to make the best use of classroom space Considering the different centers that children will use at the beginning of the school year and creating dedicated areas that will be permanent throughout the year, as well as how to make trade-offs when space is limited Looking at what materials will be necessary at the start of the school year and how this will change over the course of the year Creating a daily schedule that satisfies the demands of the administration yet doesn't rush children through the day, like a train keeping to a timetable How kindergarten and first-grade children can use their Choice Time journals to reflect on what they did at Choice Time and what might have challenged them We will have opportunities to work on Choice Time planning templates and also work together on interpreting Choice Time observations and using these interpretations to plan next steps. There will be time for questions and answers.

Renée Dinnerstein, who has over 50 years’ experience as an early childhood educator, has taught both in Italy and the US. She spent 18 years as an early childhood teacher at PS 321, one of New York City’s leading elementary schools, was teacher-director of the Children’s School Early Childhood Inclusion Annex, and also worked as an early childhood staff developer in the New York City Department of Education, Division of Instructional Support, where she wrote curriculum, led study groups and summer institutes, and helped write the New York City Prekindergarten Standards. A past member of the Teachers’ College Reading and Writing Project Early Childhood Reading “think tank,” she taught in the project’s summer institutes and presented calendar days for kindergarten and first-grade teachers. She received the Bank Street Early Childhood Educator of the Year Award in 1999. Her book, Choice Time, How to Deepen Learning Through Inquiry and Play (Prekindergarten–Second Grade) was published by Heinemann in August 2016. You can find her blog, Investigating Choice Time: Inquiry, Exploration and Play, at investigatingchoicetime.com.

MORNING WORKSHOPS

Come Learn With: Rick Ellis - SOLD OUT
Reggio Emilia: Bringing the Philosophy to America

Description:
Benevenuti a tutti! Let's spend some time looking at the basics of the Reggio Emilia philosophy as well as gaining an understanding of how the Italian culture is reflected in their schools. Then let's talk about what we can (and cannot!) do to incorporate this practice in our American schools, as well as receive validation for what we are currently doing that dovetails with the Reggio approach. We can only aspire to be Reggio-inspired, and we'll look at the many other early childhood philosophies that are in alignment with the Italian approach. Be prepared to come away with an appreciation of the Italian lifestyle and maybe even bring home some Italian vocabulary! Ciao for now!

Rick Ellis has been involved in the fields of early childhood and elementary education for over 45 years. He has taught infants through nine-year olds and has also worked in educational administration as a teaching coach/unit leader, mentor, administrator, and instructional computer coordinator. Trained at Bank Street College, Rider University, and The College of New Jersey, he also has served as head teacher and project director for the East Coast Migrant Head Start Project, serving infants through four-year-olds.He also participated in a weeklong seminar in the Reggio Emilia, Italy, school He teaches a course of his own design about transferring this philosophy to the American schools at Bank Street College of Education, and most recently taught this course in Stockholm, Sweden. His most recent professional growth endeavor was spending a week visiting the early childhood centers in Pistoia, Italy. He has been a staff member of Bank Street College for over 25 years and is an adjunct for Rider University, supervising student teachers.


Come Learn With: Kay Abrams - SOLD OUT
Using a Child's Voice as Your Guide

Description:
Listening goes beyond hearing. Listening to a child requires us to be present. Children respond and cooperate best with caretakers who listen well. This kind of attunement invites safety and security. Both are essential for learning cooperation, coping with frustration and building subsequent flexibility. Listening says, "I see you and will be able to guide you." Yet, there are important boundaries to establish in the balance of responsively listening to a child who then listens and responds to you.

In this presentation, we will address:

  • Attachment, Safety and Expressed Voice
  • Initiating a Child's Voice
  • Nonverbal Voice
  • Boundaries, Voice and Choice
  • Looking for Themes as Guidance

Dr. Kay Abrams is a psychologist in private practice and the parent of three young adults. She brings to us 25 plus years of experience working with children, adolescents, and families. In addition to providing individual and family therapy, her group practice, Abrams and Associates, Center for Family Psychotherapy, in Kensington and Rockville, Maryland, offers social and behavioral assessments, play therapy, teen girls groups, social skills groups, parent consultation, and marital therapy. Dr. Abrams works to bring psychology to the community through her public speaking, media work and her writing. She is the author of the "Parenting with Confidence" column in the Washington Parent Magazine. You can access many of her articles and podcasts on her website, abramsandassociates.com.


Come Learn With: Laura Sedlock and Mollie McQuarrie - SOLD OUT
Protecting the Needs of Young Children in a Digital Age

Description:
However we feel about the integration and infusion of technology in our world and in the lives of children, it is a reality that is here to stay and will only become increasingly ubiquitous in the days and years to come. From the impact of technology on children’s thinking and brain development to the ways that children’s work and play is informed by narratives and behaviors learned from the digital world, there is a vast range of uncharted territory for early childhood educators to learn about and address. As people who are deeply invested in the growth and development of young children, how can we draw on our expertise in early childhood development and learning to guide us in negotiating this new terrain? What aspects of technology do we want to embrace and integrate in the classroom, and what other types of experiences do we want to prioritize and ensure that children will have in school and in their lives? How can we support parents to understand these issues and respond to their questions about the role of technology in young children’s lives and development? Together we will investigate these questions through discussion, presentation, and a workshop component with three-dimensional materials.

Laura Sedlock has been the director of the Pre-Primary Program at Blue School in Lower Manhattan since 2014. She has worked in the field of early childhood education for almost 20 years, having taught at the Bank Street School for Children, City and Country School, P.S. 321 in Park Slope, Brooklyn, and Beginnings Nursery School. Laura was the educational director at Beginnings Nursery School from 2008-2014, and has served as an adjunct lecturer in the department of early childhood education at Hunter College. Before entering the field of childhood education, Laura taught English to adults in New York and Indonesia, where she lived for four years. She has a BA in English from Wesleyan University and a master's in early childhood and elementary education from Bank Street College.

Mollie McQuarrie is a parent, visual artist, musician, and educator specializing in aesthetic education as the Preprimary Studio and Materials Specialist at Blue School. Over the past 25 years, she has taken on many roles in education: classroom teacher, consultant, freelance gallery educator, adjunct professor, teaching artist, public school arts advocate, and arts integration specialist for public schools. Mollie holds an MFA from Queens College and an M.S.Ed from Bank Street College and believes that creativity, beauty, and fun are non-negotiable components of every education experience for every age of learner. In addition to her teaching, Mollie cooks, makes collages, gardens, hosts sing-alongs in her backyard, and plays the accordion and ukulele with the Brooklyn-based Dirty Waltz Band.


Come Learn With: Julia Bosch - SOLD OUT
Loose Parts and Repurposed Materials

Description:
Creative Experiences for Young Children Come learn with Julia Bosch in a workshop that provides educators opportunities to expand on the creative experiences they offer to young children. The workshop begins with a presentation on the role of creative experiences in an early childhood classroom. We will discuss ways to set up art areas to support independent art making, symbolic development, literacy, and a culture of collaboration. Participants will engage for most of the day with a variety of art materials, including "Loose Parts" or "Arrangements" with repurposed and natural materials, as well as construction with cardboard and tape, focusing on process. This workshop will focus on children ages 2 through 5.


Julia Bosch has been teaching in the Arts for fifteen years and holds a MPS in Art Therapy form the School of Visual Arts with a background in sculpture. She has mentored teachers and lead professional development workshops for school administrators, teachers and parents within New York City public and independent schools focusing on medium-driven, discovery-based education. Julia has been the Studio Teacher at The Madison Presbyterian Church Day School for the past eleven years, creating inspiring and open ended provocations with art materials for young children in classroom and studio environments.


AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

Come Learn With: Rick Ellis - SOLD OUT
Reggio Emilia: Bringing the Philosophy to America

Description:
Benevenuti a tutti! Let's spend some time looking at the basics of the Reggio Emilia philosophy as well as gaining an understanding of how the Italian culture is reflected in their schools. Then let's talk about what we can (and cannot!) do to incorporate this practice in our American schools, as well as receive validation for what we are currently doing that dovetails with the Reggio approach. We can only aspire to be Reggio-inspired, and we'll look at the many other early childhood philosophies that are in alignment with the Italian approach. Be prepared to come away with an appreciation of the Italian lifestyle and maybe even bring home some Italian vocabulary! Ciao for now!

Rick Ellis has been involved in the fields of early childhood and elementary education for over 45 years. He has taught infants through nine-year olds and has also worked in educational administration as a teaching coach/unit leader, mentor, administrator, and instructional computer coordinator. Trained at Bank Street College, Rider University, and The College of New Jersey, he also has served as head teacher and project director for the East Coast Migrant Head Start Project, serving infants through four-year-olds.He also participated in a weeklong seminar in the Reggio Emilia, Italy, school He teaches a course of his own design about transferring this philosophy to the American schools at Bank Street College of Education, and most recently taught this course in Stockholm, Sweden. His most recent professional growth endeavor was spending a week visiting the early childhood centers in Pistoia, Italy. He has been a staff member of Bank Street College for over 25 years and is an adjunct for Rider University, supervising student teachers.


Come Learn With: Kay Abrams - SOLD OUT
Teachers Helping Parents Manage Their Children with Greater Calm Confidence: Less Bribes, Less Threats and Less Exhaustion

Description:
Teachers are a great resource for parents. You can model and inspire better parenting. In this workshop, you will learn how Dr. Abrams facilitates effective behavioral management. Children thrive and grow within safe boundaries. Her parenting sessions address how to manage children with calm confident authority. No more threats, bribes and exhaustion. No more "let's make a deal or "knee jerk" parenting. No more persistent arguing, negotiating or accidentally reinforcing negative behaviors. Maintain the clarity to connect behavioral choices to outcomes. Know thyself and know thy child. Create systems based on values.

Participants will learn how to address parental anxiety. This workshop addresses:

  • Cultural factors influencing parenting
  • Biosocial psychological paradigm
  • The importance of attachment and attunement
  • Factors that undermine clear and confident parenting
  • Language that places behavioral accountability onto the child
  • General tools for increasing consistency and cooperation

Dr. Kay Abrams is a psychologist in private practice and the parent of three young adults. She brings to us 25 plus years of experience working with children, adolescents, and families. In addition to providing individual and family therapy, her group practice, Abrams and Associates, Center for Family Psychotherapy, in Kensington and Rockville, Maryland, offers social and behavioral assessments, play therapy, teen girls groups, social skills groups, parent consultation, and marital therapy. Dr. Abrams works to bring psychology to the community through her public speaking, media work and her writing. She is the author of the "Parenting with Confidence" column in the Washington Parent Magazine. You can access many of her articles and podcasts on her website, abramsandassociates.com.


Come Learn With: Judy Kashman - SOLD OUT
Foundations for Teaching Woodworking in an Early Childhood Setting

Description:
Children love to engage in exploring the world around them. They thrive when taught how to use tools to build their own “ideas.” Research has shown that children who experience hands-on exploration at an early age improve their motor skills and enhance problem-solving and critical thinking skills. In this interactive workshop, teachers will learn how to organize woodworking activities in an early childhood environment. Teachers unfamiliar with woodworking techniques will learn how to use basic hand tools in a safe and manageable way for application in their classrooms. Focusing on children aged 3-5, participants will engage in hands-on exploratory work with wood and an assortment of materials that can be utilized for creative discoveries in any child-friendly environment. Attendees will leave the session with teachable lessons ready to implement.

Judy Kashman, an art educator for nearly 40 years, holds a BS in art and art education from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. An artist and sculptor, she has participated in many educational workshops focused on creative exploration, including Adapting the Reggio Emilia Approach: Workshop in Collaborative Educational Work at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. For the past 28 years, she has been the head woodshop teacher at Village Community School in New York City, where she specializes in teaching woodworking to young children and training teachers to create materials-rich learning environments that emphasize an experiential approach. Judy has trained woodworking teachers at Washington Market School, Little Red School House, Brooklyn Apple Academy, Bank Street, Allen-Stevenson, Brearley, and Ethical Culture Fieldston School.


Come Learn With: Alicia Stoller - SOLD OUT
Nurturing the Seeds of Empathy & Moral Decision Making in Early Childhood

Description: Recent years have seen an explosion of research on the capacity very young children have for empathy. The once entrenched notion of the egocentric young child has been profoundly challenged as both social and neurological research has emerged supporting the idea that children are not only capable of empathy, but that this capacity is deeply embedded in the very mechanisms that support our biological survival. Yet the development of moral thinking and decision making is complex. Throughout the lifespan our self-regulation and perspective taking skills are developing, as is our repertoire of pro-social behaviors and our understanding of cultural norms, all of which, along with empathy, impact each individual's ability to make increasingly complex moral decisions and to take action to help others, particularly those who are removed from our own circumstances and experience or who's need overwhelms us. The workshop will provide an overview of the developmental research on empathy and moral decision making and will explore the essential early childhood experiences that nurture empathy and lay a foundation for a socially engaged, compassionate life.

Alicia Stoller has over 15 years of experience as an early childhood educator. She is the incoming Director of the Saul and Carole Zabar Nursery School and was formerly the Director of the Early Childhood Center at the Jewish Community Project, as well as a member of the founding curriculum design and administrative team at Avenues: The World School. Alicia has also served on the graduate faculty at Bank Street College in the Early Childhood program, the Educational Leadership program, and the Early Childhood Urban Education Initiative. She has supported emerging preschool programs throughout New York City as a consultant, focusing on the role of play in curriculum design, qualitative assessment of young children, and the development of empathy and kindness in the classroom. She holds a B.A. in Theater and Ethical Philosophy from Vassar College and an M.S.Ed in Early Childhood Education from Bank Street College.

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